PMI Atlanta Chapter

PMI Atlanta Chapter - Forums Summaries

Written by: Adam Gazaleh

PresentationCDC-AEC-Nov-Forum

Jennifer Bracewell from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided an engaging and unique overview of the life of a government capital construction project from inception to completion. Jennifer outlined the careful considerations that are taken into account at the beginning of the project and the controls in place to ensure that the bid process is fair and balanced. There are numerous controls in government projects that one might not see in private sector projects. Project management for government capital construction projects combines traditional project management with additional safeguards to preserve schedule and budget. The most interesting aspect of Jennifer’s presentation was hearing about the unique challenges involved with designing and relocating people in a laboratory environment. Additional challenges included the extra level of planning and detail required in government building design, particularly for an organization like the CDC.

Takeaways

• Government capital building projects are for the long term. These buildings will outlive the project participants and several groups of inhabitants might cycle through these facilities over the decades.
• Cost of changes increases significantly as you get closer to the end of the project.
• Working tours are performed so that inhabitants can become familiar with the new building and prepare to transition to a new location.
• Significant testing is done after the building is completed prior to occupancy to ensure preparedness for emergency situations.

Next Event

Join us at the next PMI Atlanta AEC Forum on Tuesday, December 8th, 2020 

Keynote Presentation:Predicting Likelihood of a Construction Project Success presented by Mahesh Kumar, CEO of Tiger Analytics.

Register at www.pmiatlanta.org/events/event-calendar


About PMI

Atlanta Chapter serves Project Management Community in Metro Atlanta, and we're an active resource to corporations, community and government agencies throughout north Georgia. With over 5,000 members, PMI Atlanta is among the top 5 chapters in the world. Our professional expertise span across industries; we’re the professionals building healthcare information technology systems, the engineers developing smarter public transportation, and the planners growing our communities more efficiently.

Written by: Jacqlyn Shelton

Josh Kite, PIVOT Agile / Enterprise Agile Coach, discussed the "Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe),” how the agile structure is implemented across enterprises to ensure optimum operation, teamwork, and valued deliverables. 

OverviewKite-Josh

Josh Kite discussed the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), the results, and how the Framework drives the completion of programs versus projects. Josh shared the delivered business results when implementing SAFe.

SAFe Framework facilitates Employee Engagement: Employees are motivated and happier when SAFe is engaged to maximize teamwork, resulting in a 30% increase in employee engagement with SAFe. Productivity: Productivity is relative to employee motivation, happiness, and collaboration, which increases productivity; there is a 35% average increase in productivity with SAFe. Quality: Employee commitment and an organization's expectation foster employee pride, improving product quality by 50% with SAFe. Time to Market: Product deliverable, an average of 50% increase of Product Time to Market with SAFe.

The SAFe Framework is loved for its delivered results and value but is also hated because of the required change of managed thinking. Organizations must move from a project organization to a product deliverable organization; a problem-solving culture is necessary for a successful SAFe transition. The SAFe Framework can be measured during the iteration cycles by evaluating if the team is focused on the right things, is the team delivering value, and are the groups growing to produce an engaging, productive environment. SAFe success is measured if the organization has met its commitments and deliverables while increasing product value.

Takeaways


• SAFe can be applied to software or business platforms.
• SAFe, when integrated throughout an enterprise, minimizes risk and produces valued deliverables.

 

Next Event
Join us at the next PMI Atlanta Agile Forum on Tuesday, November 17, 2020, 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm.

Keynote Presentation: “Value Stream Mapping” Presenter: Theodore Revilock, Naya Consulting, Principle Consultant.

Register at www.pmiatlanta.org/events/event-calendar

Written by: Cesar Montoya

Overview


On October 28, 2020, the PMI Atlanta Governance Forum hosted speaker Paulette Hamilton, Managing Partner at Freebird Technologies, LLC. Ms. Hamilton delivered a remarkably interesting presentation on risk governance and how software tools could be used to improve strategies and mechanisms to drive decisions about risks. She demonstrated examples on how the typical risk identification, analysis and communication could be improved by tech tools.Gov-Oct-Forum-pic-1

Ms. Hamilton began by helping define Risk Governance and how it is traditionally used, as well at various risk governance environments. She compared the traditional way of measuring risk that could impede a project’s quality, time, and cost versus the new project outlook of risks that impact customers, the brand and product.
The discussion then dove into different tool sets and the various purposes for which they could be used, whether to communicate, analyze or measure progress and decision making. Ms Hamilton closed with a few examples of how technology tools could be used for the different elements of a Risk Governance Framework of Risk Identification, Assessment, Monitoring, Controlling, Mitigation & Consistency and Communication. After a Q&A session she emphasized that project managers should be risk champions.

 

Next Event

Join us at the next PMI Atlanta Governance forum February, 2021
Register at www.pmiatlanta.org/events/event-calendar

Written by: Paulette Hamilton

Overview

On September 23, 2020, the PMI Atlanta Governance Forum hosted speaker Jean Dahl, Practice Director at Deloitte Consulting. Ms. Dahl delivered an informative presentation on the current challenges faced by businesses when transforming their organization from “doing” agile to embracing an agile mindset and philosophy. She shared a multimodal delivery approach that allows the flexibility to implement projects using either traditional, agile, lean or hybrid methodology. She also discussed the benefits of the multimodal approach in comparison to other approaches currently being used.
In her role as Practice Director, Ms. Dahl has noticed executive management concern around measuring the effectiveness of their organization across different delivery methods. She discussed key metrics at each level of the organization, and pointed out the lag in tools that have the ability to align costs across delivery platforms. The Multimodal model dictates aligning the PMO with Enterprise Portfolio Management Office at the strategic level and the Lean Portfolio Management at the tactical level.

Ms. Dahl closed the discussion with a summary of crucial questions that organizations should ask when transforming their legacy PMO to a lean portfolio management organization. There was great audience participation and Ms. Dahl interactively answered questions throughout.


Takeaways

• Organizations are often too focused on “doing” agile and should shift attention to embracing and agile mindset and philosophy.
• The Multimodal Operating Model represents a “fit-for-purpose” approach that allows various work types to coexist.


Next Event

Join us at the next PMI Atlanta Governance forum on October 21, 2020
Keynote Presentation: “Technology & Risk Governance”: presented by Paulette Hamilton, Managing Partner

Register at www.pmiatlanta.org/events/event-calendar


About PMI

Atlanta Chapter serves Project Management Community in Metro Atlanta, and we're an active resource to corporations, community and government agencies throughout north Georgia. With over 5,000 members, PMI Atlanta is among the top 5 chapters in the world. Our professional expertise span across industries; we’re the professionals building healthcare information technology systems, the engineers developing smarter public transportation, and the planners growing our communities more efficiently.

Written by: Jacqlyn Shelton

Retrospective Meetings provide essential feedback that generate process improvements for each iteration of an agile project cycle.

OverviewOrdonna-Sargent

Ordonna Sargeant (PMP, Certified Scrum Master, LSSGB, @ABlackPMP) explained how to structure a fun and engaging Retrospective Meeting that analyzes and evaluates a project to:
• Develop a list of critical steps in each iteration of an agile project to improve processes.
• Generate team synergy, growth, honesty, and commitment.

Team Engagement: Leaders can engage team members using a variety of structures. Regardless of the method used, it is essential that the questions: “what worked well,” “what didn't work,” and “how should we move forward" are answered. An example of a retrospective structure is the “Start, Stop, Continue” structure:
a) Start Process List (What should we start doing);
b) Stop Process List (What should we stop doing); and
c) Continue Process List (What is working well and should be continued).

The goal is to align the team so they can evaluate and improve the processes. All owners and development team members must be encouraged to engage in the discovery; asking team members questions can promote participation. Additional Retrospective Structures are:Agile-September-event

• What? So What? Now What?
• Liked, Loathed, Longed for, and Learned
• Wishes, Risk, Appreciation, and Puzzles (WRAP)

Meeting Tools: A retrospective meeting requires the leader to actively engage participants in an analytical analysis that identifies issues and provides input to improve processes. Leaders must create an engaging environment of relaxation, participation, and excitement. Utilize:
• Communication Tools: Whiteboards and Webcams.
• Feedback Resources: Discussions, Polling, and Surveys, during and after the meeting.

Challenges: Identify when Lack of Engagement and/or Groupthink creep into a meeting; both can hinder the purpose of the retrospective meeting. Ask open-ended questions throughout the session to all team members to initiate project engagement, commitment, and team growth.
Informing the participants that their honest observations are valued and needed throughout the meeting will encourage an open forum of individualism that generates valuable ideas.

Takeaways

• Create a safe space for involvement and feedback.
• Encourage the team to think in action-oriented terms.
• Engage inclusiveness from all team members.
• Identify small results that lead to significant improvements.
• End the meeting on a high note, a positive reflection of results from the session.


Next Event

Join us at the next PMI Atlanta Agile Forum on Tuesday, October 20, 2020, 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm.
Keynote Presentation: “Demystifying the Scaled Agile Framework” Presenter: Josh Kite

Register at www.pmiatlanta.org/events/event-calendar


 About PMI

Atlanta Chapter serves Project Management Community in Metro Atlanta, and we're an active resource to corporations, community and government agencies throughout north Georgia. With over 5,000 members, PMI Atlanta is among the top 5 chapters in the world. Our professional expertise span across industries; we’re the professionals building healthcare information technology systems, the engineers developing smarter public transportation, and the planners growing our communities more efficiently.